We unite in times of disaster

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I was reading a fellow country man’s article titled  “Why the Southern Highlands & Hela Provinces are important to me” and it inspired me to tell this story.  It almost brought tears down as I reflected on a similar experience back in 2001 when I was at Gordon’s market in Port Moresby. I was with a young Erave youth; his name is Leme who left his village when he was aged 5 years with his older brother because of a tribal fight that destroyed his entire village and displaced the villagers.  He went back to his village after some years but he could not settle in so he drifted to Madang with some “wantoks”. Homeless and wondering around I found him in town and took him in after hearing about his ordeals. He just became part of the family and he even changed his surname to my family name. Anyway we were in Port Moresby trying to locate his older brother who lived somewhere at 5 mile area.  As soon as we got off the PMV at Gordons market and walked past some women sitting behind their esky coolers selling ice block, his face suddenly lit up and he smiled. I asked what he was smiling about and he told me, “mi harim tokples ya”. (I can hear my native language being spoken.)

We eventually found some information from the ladies and went to 5 mile where he was reunited with his brother after all these years. He decided to stay with me in Madang instead of with his older brother. He is now married to a lady from Banab, NCR Madang and lives with her in the village.

Anyway, the point of these experience after reading the article by Scott Waide, I made these comments on his blog: “from my point of view we are all Papua New Guineans despite our language barriers and cultures. I am from the coastal region and I don’t know how to speak Erave or Tari languages but that did not stop the brotherhood that developed between Leme and myself.  Personally, I disagree with provincial day events and provincial flags. It only separates our unity as Papua New Guineans. I believe we should do away with promoting provinciality as it only stereotypes us into classes. Natural disasters like the Rabaul Volcanic eruptions in 1994, Aitepe Tsuanmi in 1998 and recent disasters at Manam, Kadovar and Mendi have brought back that unity of independence in 1975 despite our Provincial barriers.  Learning of how Bougainville supplied aid to the victims of the 7.5 magnitude earthquake in Southern Highlands is a classic example of this story. The bottom line is that we unite in times of disaster and emergency despite our cultural differences is a phenomenon worth considering in reforming our government of the day, its country values and our constitutional rights.”

Scott mentioned in another article that “…in the last 10 years, the monopoly of information has shifted from government to citizens…” and “…in a disaster prone country like Papua New Guinea, it is crucial that we review our processes and use our resources better..” which I totally agree with. There is no civil defense set up in Papua New Guinea unlike most countries. I am not referring to the PNGDF or the National Disaster Center in Port Moresby but non-combatant civilians, volunteers trained in the capacity of providing humanitarian relief work. This can be taught in schools by reforming education curriculums and the national qualification framework to train civilians at all levels of education.

If we really value National Security, as citizens we should not take sides in the political arena while the current sovereignty of our nation and democracy is being manipulated by greed, foreign gain and power.  Unity in times of disaster should be the same when it concerns the governance of national security.

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Snowden Live Q&A On Trump: “Don’t Fear Trump. Fear The Risk Of Spying”

Source:  fossBytes

After Donald Trump becoming the president many people have been talking about how he would affect different things.

Privacy is one of those things because the security agencies based in the US are known for their surveillance hobbies. The new elected president would definitely have some sort of impact on privacy and how the spying activities would continue in the future.

Edward Snowden, the man who made the world serious about their personal information available on the internet, will host a live stream event on StartPage–a Dutch search engine–on November 10 (4:30pm Eastern Time). Obviously, Snowden is the right person to talk about privacy considered his past experience.

In this event, he will talk about Donald Trump and privacy issues. Notably, Edward Snowden is expecting a presidential pardon.

[Update]

In the interview, Snowden talked about various topics ranging from the new president-elect to his condition and what needs to be done in future. He said that technology, instead of running after legislation, should be used to achieve privacy. When we think the law is not efficient enough to protect our rights, we should start supporting the corporations, groups, and individuals–the ones who are trying to enforce your rights through science, math, and technology so that the governments start respecting your rights. “No amount of violence, no amount of military force will ever solve a math problem,” he said.

When asked about Trump

Snowden did not follow the event to talk specifically about the new president. He kept a safe distance from the name Donald Trump. But, he was prepared for such questions. When the PGP protocol creator Phil Zimmermann asked him about Trump, Snowden said he would be getting a powerful surveillance infrastructure. But, we should not set our focus on a single leader or government.

“We should be cautious about putting too much faith or fear in elected officials,” said Snowden.

“We’re never farther than an election away from a change in leader, from a change in policy, a change in the way the powers we have constructed into a system are used. So what we need to think about now is not how do we defend against a president Donald Trump, but how do we protect the rights of everyone, everywhere, without regard to jurisdictions, without regard to borders?”

Snowden did not directly talk about the impact of Trump’s presidency but he expressed his belief in one of the answers:

“Despite the challenges we have in the United States, despite the changes in government, despite some of the very concerning statements made by our new President-elect, this is a nation that will strive to get better.”

“This is a dark moment in our nation’s history – but it is not the end of history. and if we work together, we can build something better.”

GENO JOINS PANGU: STRATEGIC ADVISOR ON INTERNAL SECURITY

Source: Bryan Kramer

NatSec

(Geno seated second from the left)

Former Chief of Police and Ombudsman Illa Geno has formally joined Pangu Party as a strategic adviser on Internal Security.

Geno began his career as a police officer in 1968 as a detective under Australian administration. He served 25 years in the force, bestowed the top position of Chief of Police in 1992. After serving out his two year contract as Commissioner of Police he was later appointment Chairman of Public Service Commission in 1993. In 1999 Geno joined the Ombudsman Commission, two years later he was elevated to the top position of Chief Ombudsman.

During his term as head of Ombudsman Commission Geno holds the highest record of referrals of Members of Parliament to face the Leadership Tribunal. He was later forced to retire after meeting the mandatory age of 60.

Geno joins Pangu with the highest credentials in law enforcement as well as leadership and governance.

Pangu Party Leader Sam Basil welcomed Geno to Pangu’s impressive team of strategic political advisers. Geno now joins retired Chief of Defence Force Brigadier Major Jerry Singarock – (National Security) Bryan Kramer (Chief Political Strategist) Dulciana Somare Brash (International Relations & Policy)