Those who’ve come across the seas: New names unveiled on the Welcome Wall. — Australian National Maritime Museum

This Sunday, 25 September 2016, saw 882 new names unveiled on our migrant Welcome Wall in honour of all those who have migrated from around the world by sea or air to live in Australia. The museum unveils new names on the Welcome Wall twice a year. 2016 marks the 17th year of unveiling ceremonies, bringing […]

via Those who’ve come across the seas: New names unveiled on the Welcome Wall. — Australian National Maritime Museum

Taiwan asks Google to blur images from disputed island

Taiwan has asked Google to blur satellite images of what appear to be new military installations on a disputed island in the South China Sea.

Taiping Island, also known as Itu Aba, is part of the Spratly Island chain, embroiled in increasingly tense South China Sea territorial disputes.

Although it is controlled by Taiwan, the island is also claimed by mainland China, Vietnam and the Philippines.

Four new structures have appeared since Google Earth’s last satellite images.

The images showed four three-pronged structures in a semi-circle next to an upgraded airstrip and near a sizeable new port.

What is the South China Sea dispute?

Rival countries have wrangled over territory in the South China Sea for centuries, but tension has steadily increased in recent years.

Its islets and waters are claimed in part or in whole by Taiwan, China, Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia and Brunei.

China has backed its expansive claims with island-building and naval patrols, while the US, which has also sailed through the disputed waters, says it opposes restrictions on freedom of navigation and unlawful sovereignty claims by all sides.

The frictions have sparked concern that the area is becoming a flashpoint with possible global consequences.

Why is the South China Sea contentious?

Taiwan Defence Ministry spokesman Chen Chung-chi said on Wednesday that “under the pre-condition of protecting military secrets and security, we have requested Google blur images of important military facilities”.

The country’s Coast Guard Administration also confirmed to the BBC that it was in talks with Google, which they said may not have been aware it was a military zone.

The Coast Guard said it believed other countries would have similar issues with images of such restricted zones.

Google has said that it is reviewing the request.

“We take security concerns very seriously, and are always willing to discuss them with public agencies and officials,” Google spokesman Taj Meadows told the BBC.

It has not blurred imagery in response to similar requests in the past. Much of this imagery comes from third party providers, which means that it is likely to be available through a number of other commercial routes.

The increasing militarisation of the South China Sea, where China is rapidly building islands to buttress its territorial claims has stoked tension in the region.

An international tribunal recently ruled against China’s claims, backing a case brought by the Philippines.

The Permanent Court of Arbitration ruled Taiping was classified as a “rock” rather than an “island” and therefore not entitled to a 200 nautical mile exclusion zone.The verdict was rejected by both Beijing and Taipei.

 

Boat carrying 600 migrants capsize off Egypt coast

Source: CNN

A boat carrying 600 migrants has capsized off the Egyptian coast near Kafr al-Sheikh, the Egyptian military said Wednesday.

Around 150 people have been rescued and authorities have retrieved at least 29 bodies so far, the country’s state media reported.

The boat was on its way to Italy, the news agency MENA reported, attributing the information to the military.

But migrants are leaving African countries in large numbers for Europe, often in rickety boats on perilous voyages that regularly turn fatal.

On Tuesday, the Egyptian military arrested 68 people on a boat trying to make its way to Europe. They were captured off the coast of Matrouh.

Last week, the country’s navy thwarted two attempts by people trying to cross from Egypt to Europe. More than 400 would-be migrants from various nationalities were arrested in that operation.

Hanjin Shipping’s Parent Steps In to Help Unload Stranded Cargo — Fortune

Hanjin Shipping’s parent firm plans to raise 100 billion won ($90.46 million) to fund the unloading of billions of dollars worth of cargo aboard vessels stranded around the world in the wake of its court receivership filing last week. Hanjin Group, the parent of Hanjin Shipping, will raise 60 billion won while Hanjin Group chairman…

via Hanjin Shipping’s Parent Steps In to Help Unload Stranded Cargo — Fortune

That Heartbreaking Photo of Alan Kurdi Was Taken a Year Ago. It Still Matters — TIME

A year has passed since Alan Kurdi, a 3-year-old Syrian refugee, drowned on a Turkish beach. His family had fled war, looking for peaceful and better lives in the West. Their dreams were crushed when the boat carrying them from Turkey to Greece capsized in the early hours of Sept. 2, 2015. The gut-wrenching photograph…

via That Heartbreaking Photo of Alan Kurdi Was Taken a Year Ago. It Still Matters — TIME

46 People Rescued From Sinking Fishing Boat Off Alaska’s Coast — TIME

(ANCHORAGE, Alaska) — Two Good Samaritan vessels rescued 46 people Tuesday night who abandoned their sinking fishing boat in the Bering Sea off Alaska’s Aleutian Islands, the Coast Guard said. There were no reports of any injuries as the crew members were transferred from life rafts to the merchant ships, in a fairly calm seas,…

via 46 People Rescued From Sinking Fishing Boat Off Alaska’s Coast — TIME

Despite Legal Victory in South China Sea, Philippines’ Oil Remains in Troubled Waters — Fortune

“Chinese coastguard vessels harass our survey ships.”

via Despite Legal Victory in South China Sea, Philippines’ Oil Remains in Troubled Waters — Fortune