Does Your Radio Comply With The New IMO Regulations?

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Regulations set down by IMO came into action at the beginning of this month. These regulations involved firefighters radios used aboard vessels. As suppliers of these radios, it is important for us to inform our customers of this regulation and also to assure you that all equipment being supplied to you actually comply with these standards.

The Regulation

SOLAS regulation II-2/10.10.4 requires that: “For ships constructed on or after 1 July 2014, a minimum of two two-way portable radiotelephone apparatus for each fire party for fire-fighter’s communication shall be carried on board. Those two-way portable radiotelephone apparatus shall be of an explosion-proof type or intrinsically safe. Ships constructed before 1 July 2014 shall comply with the requirements of this paragraph not later than the first safety equipment survey after 1 July 2018.”

We are pleased to advise you that ALL radio’s sold on AMI Marines NEW website comply with the imposed IMO regulations.

We can meet your fire-fighters requirements for SOLAS amendments.

Our radios include:

  • ATEX Approved IIC – The HT900 range of ATEX certified portables meet IIC T4.
  • ATEX Approved IIA – The HT800 range of ATEX certified portables meet IIA T4.
  • IECEx Approved – The HT500 range of two way intrinsically safe certified portable radios meet IECEx certification – suitable for those users who do not need to comply with the European ATEX standard.

Press Release: www.amimarine.com

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‘Grieving’ Killer Whale Mother Carries Calf’s Body a Week After It Died

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By Associated Press

July 30, 2018

SEATTLE — An endangered orca that spends time in Pacific Northwest waters is still carrying the corpse of her calf one week after it died.

Experts with the Whale Museum on San Juan Island have been monitoring the 20-year-old whale, known as J35, since her calf died shortly after birth Tuesday. For days now, the whale has been balancing the dead calf on her forehead or pushing it to the surface of the water.

Jenny Atkinson, the museum’s executive director, says the orca was still carrying her dead calf Monday afternoon.

Atkinson says the orca and her pod are going through “a deep grieving process.”

The calf was the first in three years to be born to the dwindling population of endangered southern resident killer whales. There are only 75.

Zimbabwe is signing up for China’s surveillance state, but its citizens will pay the price.

china.jpgBy Amy Hawkins

Daily life in China is gated by security technology, from the body scanners and X-ray machines at every urban metro station to the demand for ID numbers on social media platforms so that dangerous speech can be traced and punished. Technologies once seen as potentially empowering the public have become tools for an increasingly dictatorial government—tools that Beijing is now determined to sell to the developing world.

In 2015, the Chinese government launched its Made in China 2025 plan to dominate cutting-edge technological industries. This was followed up last year for plans for the country to be a world leader in the field of artificial intelligence by 2030 and to build a $150 billion industry. The developing world is a big part of these ambitions. But China doesn’t just want to dominate these markets. It wants to use developing countries as a laboratory to improve its own surveillance technologies.

Many parts of Africa are now essentially reliant on Chinese companies for their telecoms and digital services. Transsion Holdings, a Shenzhen-based company, was the No. 1 smartphone company in Africa in 2017. ZTE, a Chinese telecoms giant, provides the infrastructure for the Ethiopian government to monitor its citizens’ communications. Hikvision, the world’s leading surveillance camera manufacturer, has just opened an office in Johannesburg.

The latest is CloudWalk Technology, a Guangzhou-based start-up that has signed a deal with the Zimbabwean government to provide a mass facial recognition program. The agreement is currently on hold until Zimbabwe’s elections on July 30. But if it goes through, it will enable Zimbabwe, a country with a bleak record on human rights, to replicate parts of the surveillance infrastructure that have made freedoms so limited in China. And by gaining access to a population with a racial mix far different from China’s, CloudWalk will be better able to train racial biases out of its facial recognition systems—a problem that has beleaguered facial recognition companies around the world and which could give China a vital edge.

The CloudWalk deal is built on the back of a long-standing relationship between former Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe’s regime, seen by China as an ideological ally, and Beijing. Current President Emmerson Mnangagwa was sworn into office in November 2017 after a military coup forced Mugabe to resign after 37 years of increasingly repressive rule. But activists fear that Mnangagwa, Mugabe’s former consigliere, will continue the patterns of his predecessor, especially if his regime is backed up with new security technology.

The deal between CloudWalk and the Zimbabwean government will not cover just CCTV cameras. According to a report in the Chinese state newspaper Science and Technology Daily, smart financial systems, airport, railway, and bus station security, and a national facial database will all be part of the project. The deal—along with dozens of other cooperation agreements between Harare and Chinese technology and biotech firms—was signed in April. Like every other foreign deal done by a Chinese firm of late, it has been wrapped into China’s increasingly all-encompassing Belt and Road Initiative.

Like every other foreign deal done by a Chinese firm of late, it has been wrapped into China’s increasingly all-encompassing Belt and Road Initiative.

Like every other foreign deal done by a Chinese firm of late, it has been wrapped into China’s increasingly all-encompassing Belt and Road Initiative.

The CloudWalk deal is the first Chinese AI project in Africa. Google is opening its first Africa AI research center in Ghana this year, but Eric Olander, founder of the China Africa Project—a podcast and online resource that examines the relationship between China and Africa—noted that many Western companies “aren’t willing to make that step that the Chinese are willing to do. … [The Chinese] are willing to make an investment in a market as volatile as Zimbabwe, where companies from other countries are not.”

Indeed, with massive state and private backing for AI projects—according to a CB Insights report, nearly half of global investment in AI went to Chinese start-ups last year, surpassing the United States for the first time—Chinese companies can afford to take risks. CloudWalk itself was the recipient of a $301 million grant from the Guangzhou municipal government.

“We are concerned about the deal, given how CloudWalk provides facial recognition technologies to the Chinese police,” said Maya Wang, a senior China researcher for Human Rights Watch. “We have previously documented [the Chinese] Ministry of Public Security’s use of AI-enabled technologies for mass surveillance that targets particular social groups, such as ethnic minorities and those who pose political threats to the government.”

Some Zimbabweans are concerned about how their data will fare in China. Andy, who asked that only his first name be used, is studying for a Ph.D. at Beijing Normal University. For him, “the question is what the Chinese company will do with our identities. … It sounds like a spy game.” He also says that he “know[s] for a fact” that “the Zimbabwe government will use this tech to try and control people’s freedom.”

In Zimbabwe, freedom of expression has long been curtailed or monitored by various means. In 2015, Mugabe accepted a gift of cyber surveillance software from the Iranian government, including IMSI catchers, which are used to eavesdrop on telephone conversations. In 2016, he cited China as an example of social media regulation that he hoped Zimbabwe could emulate.

British ex-spies warn of risks dealing with Chinese telecom Huawei

By Europe bureau chief Lisa Millar

Two of Britain’s top cyber security experts have warned against ignoring Huawei, saying banning the Chinese telecommunications giant is not an option for the West.

Robert Hannigan, former director of Britain's intelligence and security organisation GCHQ.

“In the future there will be lots of technologies that we need where the best provider in the world and the best technology is Chinese,” said Robert Hannigan, the former director of Britain’s intelligence and security organisation GCHQ.

“What are we going to do about this?

“Are we going to cut ourselves off from this, or are we going to manage the risk?”

The answer, according to Mr Hannigan and Nigel Inkster — a 30-year veteran of the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) — is to accept that with risks come rewards.

“What we need to do is look at this at the broader strategic context of who controls and dominates these technologies at a global level in the 21st century,” Mr Inkster said.

Huawei entered the British market in 2001, and by 2005 had signed off on its first UK contract with BT (formerly British Telecom) as it embarked on a multi-billion-pound upgrade of its network.

“I think those in the intelligence and security community were from the outset aware of the problem that this relationship could cause,” Mr Inkster said.

“But one has to bear in mind that … this was taking place in a different era, we were still in a kind of end-of-history moment.

“There was simply less awareness within government as a whole of these security issues, and frankly less of a disposition to take them particularly seriously.”

The Cell

In 2010, the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre (HCSEC) was created — otherwise known as The Cell.

In a nondescript brown brick building in an industrial site 90 minutes north of London sits a team of cyber security experts, employed by Huawei and overseen by the British Government.

Positions advertised for the Banbury facility say Huawei is seeking those looking to build a “rewarding career in cyber security”.

Their job is to ensure the integrity of Huawei’s products, which include equipment used across the UK’s fibre-optic network.

It is a model that has been suggested for Australia, to ease concerns about security to the critical national infrastructure.

But the July annual report from the board that oversees The Cell raised concerns, using language not seen in its three previous reports.

“Identification of shortcomings in Huawei’s engineering processes have exposed new risks in the UK telecommunication networks and long-term challenges in mitigation and management,” the report said.

“Due to areas of concern exposed through the proper functioning of the mitigation strategy and associated oversight mechanisms, the oversight board can provide only limited assurance that all risks to UK national security from Huawei’s involvement in the UK’s critical networks have been sufficiently mitigated.”

Its concerns were sent to the British Prime Minister’s national security adviser.

“It looks like a bit of a warning shot has been fired by the UK Government,” Mr Hannigan said, who until last year oversaw the board that issued the report.

“It’s [The Cell] working up to a point, is the way I’d put it.

“The question is, what’s the alternative? Is the alternative banning Huawei better? I don’t think it is actually.”

Huawei welcomed the UK report and the feedback.

“It confirms the collaborative approach adopted by Huawei, the UK Government and operators is working as designed, meeting obligations and providing unique, world-class network integrity assurance through ongoing risk management,” a spokesperson for Huawei told the ABC.

“The report concludes that HCSEC’s operational independence is both robust and effective.”

Huawei insisted it was under more scrutiny than any other telco and The Cell had been proven as the best model for compliance.

The risk

But both Mr Inkster and Mr Hannigan agreed there were risks to dealing with Huawei.

“Huawei has relied very substantially on Chinese Government investment and technological assistance to develop rapidly to the point where they are,” Mr Inkster said.

“And if the Chinese Government ask them to do something, they’re not in the position to refuse.

“The challenge for those who simply want to ban it is, what’s the alternative?” Mr Hannigan reiterated.

“The challenge for those who think they can manage it is — are you kidding yourselves?

“There is simply no magic solution.”

Topics: world-politics, government-and-politics, defence-and-national-security, information-and-communication, science-and-technology, united-kingdom, china

BAE score Oz deal

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Ships to be built locally.

BAE wins multi-billion pound Australian warship contract

British defence giant BAE Systems has won a multi-billion pound contract from the Australian government to build nine new warships, marking a significant victory for British military exports.

BAE beat Italian and Spanish rivals to win a large slice of the £19.6bn ($25.7bn; A$35bn) spending programme.

The ships will be based on anti-submarine frigates that BAE is building for the UK’s Royal Navy.

However, the new warships will be built in Australia by a local workforce.

BAE’s Australian arm said the construction of the ships locally would make a significant contribution to Australia’s economy “creating thousands of jobs, supporting new industries and boosting the national supply chain for decades to come”.

“We are proud to have been selected as preferred tenderer to provide the Royal Australian Navy with a world-class ship, equipped with the latest technologies and designed specifically to meet its needs,” BAE Systems Australia chief executive, Gabby Costigan said.

UK Prime Minister Theresa May said the deal was also an “enormous boost” for the UK economy and reflected the government’s strategy to “build on our close relationships with allies like Australia” as the UK prepares to leave the EU.

It is the first export of a British design for new-build frigates since the 1970s, the UK government said.

The ships to be built will be based on BAE Systems’ Type 26 frigate, and will be called the “Hunter class”.

Production in Australia is expected to commence in 2020.

Read more…

Allianz Safety and Shipping Review 2018 – Cyber, Climate Risks and Human Error Threaten Shipping’s Safety Progress

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(http://www.MaritimeCyprus.com) Shipping is the lifeblood of the global economy, transporting 90% of global trade. Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS) recently released its annual report, Safety & Shipping Review 2018. The report highlights cyber, climate risks and human error as the main factors threatening shipping’s safety progress during the 12 months prior to December 31, 2017 (full report can be downloaded at the bottom of this article).

Highlights from this year’s findings, which analyzes reported shipping losses over 100 gross tons, include:

  • Shippers continue to grapple with balancing the benefits and risks of increasing automation on board. The NotPaetya cyber-attack caused cargo delays and congestion at nearly 80 ports, further underlying the growth of cyber risk.
  • Changing climate conditions bring new route risks, particularly in the Arctic and North Atlantic Waters – over 1,000 icebergs drifted into North Atlantic shipping lanes last year.
  • 94 large ships lost worldwide in 2017, down by more than a third over 10 years. Bad weather involved in 1 in 4 losses.
  • Accident hotspot – South China and South East Asian waters lost 30 ships.

Large shipping losses have declined 38% over the past decade, according to Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty’s (AGCS) Safety & Shipping Review 2018, with this downward trend continuing in 2017. Recent events such as the collision of the oil tanker “Sanchi” and the impact of the NotPetya malware on harbor logistics underscore both the traditional and emerging risk challenges faced by the shipping sector.

There were 94 total losses reported around the shipping world in 2017, down 4% year-on-year (98) – the second lowest in 10 years after 2014. Bad weather, such as typhoons in Asia and hurricanes in the U.S., contributed to the loss of more than 20 vessels, according to the annual review, which analyzes reported shipping losses over 100 gross tons (GT).

“The decline in frequency and severity of total losses over the past year continues the positive trend of the past decade. Insurance claims have been relatively benign, reflecting improved ship design and the positive effects of risk management policy and safety regulation over time,” says Baptiste Ossena, Global Leader Hull & Marine, AGCS. “However, as the use of new technologies on board vessels grows, we expect to see changes in the maritime loss environment in the future.”

New risk exposures for the shipping sector include:

  • Ever-larger container ships pose fire containment and salvage issues.
  • Changing climate conditions bring new route risks, particularly in the Arctic and North Atlantic waters.
  • Environmental scrutiny is growing as the industry seeks to cut emissions, which brings new technical risks coupled with the threat of machinery damage.
  • Shippers continue to grapple with balancing the benefits and risks of increasing automation on board. The NotPetya cyber-attack caused cargo delays and congestion at nearly 80 ports, further underlying the growth of cyber risk.

“New” Bermuda Triangle, Dangerous Seas, and Friday 13th

Nearly one third of shipping losses in 2017 (30) occurred in the South China, Indochina, Indonesia and Philippines maritime region, up 25% annually, driven by activity in Vietnamese waters. This area has been the major global loss hotspot for the past decade, leading some media commentators to label it the “new Bermuda Triangle.” The major loss factors are actually weather – in November 2017, Typhoon Damrey caused six losses, busy seas and lower safety standards on some domestic routes.

Outside of Asia, the East Mediterranean and Black Sea region is the second major loss hotspot (17) followed by the British Isles (8).There was  a 29% annual increase in reported shipping incidents in Arctic Circle waters (71), according to AGCS analysis.

Cargo vessels (53) accounted for more than half of all vessels lost globally in 2017. Fishing and passenger vessel losses are down year-on-year. Bulk carriers accounted for five of the 10 largest reported total losses by GT. The most common cause of global losses remains foundering (sinking), with 61 sinkings in 2017. Wrecked/stranded ranks second (13), followed by machinery damage/failure (8).

Analysis shows Friday is the most dangerous day at sea – 175  of 1,129 total losses reported have occurred on this day over the past decade. Friday the 13th really can be unlucky – three ships were lost on this day in 2012 including the Costa Concordia, the largest-ever marine insurance loss.

Human Error: Still a big issue. Data can help.

Despite decades of safety improvements, the shipping industry has no room for complacency. Fatal accidents such as the “Sanchi” oil tanker collision in January 2018 and the loss of the “El Faro” in Hurricane Joaquin in late 2015 persist, and human behavior is often a factor. It is estimated that 75% to 96% of shipping accidents involve human error. It is also behind 75% of 15,000 marine liability insurance industry claims analyzed by AGCS – costing $1.6bn.

“Crews are under increasing pressure as shipping supply chains are streamlined for greater efficiency. While vessels once spent weeks in port, turn-around times for a cargo ship are now measured in days; such tight schedules can have a detrimental effect on safety culture and decision-making,” stated Andrew Kinsey, Sr. Marine Risk Consultant, AGCS. “There is always the need to strike the right balance between safety and commercial pressures. We need to look at behavior modification and how to get personnel to move away from normalizing risk.”

Moving forward, better use of data and analytics could help as the shipping industry produces a significant amount of data, but could utilize it better to produce real-time findings and alerts. New insights from crew behavior and near-misses can identify trends as predictive analysis may be the difference between a safe voyage and a disaster.

Behavioral and cultural risk need addressing. Technology can help

Despitehuge improvements in maritime safety, fatal accidents at sea persist. Human error continues to be a major driver of incidents and captains and crews are under increasing commercial pressure as supply chains are streamlined. Tight schedules can have a detrimental effect on safety culture and decision-making leading to the“normalization of risk”. Better use of data and analytics can help to address this. The shipping industry has learned from losses in the past but predictive analysis is important for the future. New insights from crew behavior and near-misses can help identify human error trends. Sensor technology can also enhance risk management. For example, hull stress monitoring sensors could be linked to ship navigation in bad weather, feeding real-time information on structural integrity. However, over-reliance on technology on board must be avoided. Continual training is imperative to ensure the right balance is achieved between technology and human intervention.

Industry’s struggle with container ship fires continues

Major fires oncontainer vessels are one of the most significant safety issues. The blaze on the ultra-large container ship (ULCS) Maersk Honam in March 2018 is one of a number of incidents in recent years. Issues driving container ship fire exposures include the adequacy of firefighting capabilities as vessels become larger, misdeclaration of cargo, salvage challenges and time taken to access a port of refuge. ULCS provide economies of scale but the industry needs to ensure risk management standards are up to speed, as larger container ships are on their way.

Record-breaking hurricane season brings supply chain and yacht problems:

Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria (HIM) and other severe weather events in 2017, such as Typhoons Damrey and Hato, show traditional maritime risks should not be overlooked. AGCS analysis shows bad weather directly contributed to at least 21 total losses in 2017 and this could yet increase further (see page 9). Fuel market, cargo, cruise ship and port operations were also disrupted, leading to natural catastrophes being ranked the top risk by shipping experts in the Allianz Risk Barometer 2018. Shippers need to consider scenarios where multiple locations are impacted when drawing up contingency plans.

Shippers get serious about cyber threat as penalties increase

Cyber incidents like the global NotPetya malware event have served as a wake-up call for the shipping sector. Many operators previously thought themselves isolated from this threat.  At the same time, new European Union laws such as the Network and Information Security Directive (NIS), which requires large ports and maritime transport services to report any cyber incidents and brings financial penalties, will exacerbate the fall-out from any future failure – malicious or accidental.

Other key risk topics include:

Autonomous shipping and drones:  Legal, safety and cyber security issues are likely to limit widespread growth of crewless ships, for now. Human error risk will still be present in decision-making algorithms and onshore monitoring bases. Drones and submersibles, however, have the potential to make a significant contribution to shipping safety and risk management. Future use could include pollution assessment, cargo tank inspections, monitoring pirates and assessment of the condition of a ship’s hull in a grounding incident.

Climate change: Climate change is impacting ice hazards for shipping, freeing up new trade routes in some areas, while increasing the risk of ice in others – over 1,000 icebergs drifted into North Atlantic shipping lanes last year, creating potential collision hazards. Cargo volumes on the Northern Sea Route reached a record high in 2017.

Emission Levels: Estimates suggest that the shipping sector’s emissions levels are as high as Germany’s, prompting a recent pledge to reduce all emissions by 50% in the long-term, alongside existing commitments to reduce sulphur oxide emissions by 2020. As the industry looks to technical solutions to achieve these aims, there could be accompanying risk issues with engines and bunkering of biofuels, as well as operator training.

For more details, in depth analysis and more infographics, click on below image to download full report

 

Source: Allianz Insurance

‘It’s Pretty Ugly.’ A Wildfire Raging Near Yosemite Is Leaving Small Businesses in the Dust — TIME

A roaring wildfire near Yosemite National Park has dampened one of the busiest and most lucrative weeks of the year for the area’s quaint bed and breakfasts, popular hotels, and tour companies that bring visitors to El Capitan, Half Dome, and the park’s other iconic features. For the first time in 28 years, Yosemite National…

via ‘It’s Pretty Ugly.’ A Wildfire Raging Near Yosemite Is Leaving Small Businesses in the Dust — TIME